From the inner space of quiet, self-quarantine lockdowns, to the outer space of “Star Trek: Picard”, Dean Haglund and Phil Leirness take you on quite the journey this week! It starts with their latest observations about themselves and others in the wake of another week of isolation. Sadness, quiet and dehumanization are on the thematic menu! They then compare notes on their respective Easter celebrations, which leads to a discussion of a couple of classic musicals: 1934’s Fred Astaire-Ginger Rogers vehicle The Gay Divorcee and 1948’s seasonal staple Easter Parade, starring Astaire and Judy Garland. The recent, modern classic, Uncut Gems gets championed by Phil, who tries to get Dean to overcome his trepidation surrounding Adam Sandler performances (and yet, Dean once championed You Don’t Mess With the Zohan, so go figure!). The second half of the show consists of Dean and Phil comparing the years in cinema 1973 and 1974, discussing all the notable films from those two halcyon years, in hopes of determining which year might challenge 1962 as the greatest year in cinema. Finally, your friends in podcasting beam up to the La Sirena to discuss and debate what went right and what went wrong in season one of “Star Trek: Picard”, a show so successful that a big-screen movie version is already in the planning stages.

A true prodigy, singer-songwriter EmiSunshine earned national attention before she was ten years old. Now, still shy of her sixteenth birthday, EmiSunshine is a skillful and soulful purveyor of the music genre known as Americana. After playing one of her brand new tunes, Dean Haglund interviews her in the first half of this week’s show and she even shares a ghost story! In the second half of the show, Dean reviews Leigh Whannell’s The Invisible Man and Phil shares with Dean a hilarious story about a mutual friend’s adventures in screenwriting. Finally, Dean and Phil celebrate the peerless cinematic legacy of the great Max Von Sydow. Something for everyone? We like to think so!

12 years ago this week, your friends in podcasting were recording their first show in stereo (rather than the two channel mono that was absolutely bonkers) and were discussing Gary Oldman’s sex appeal and The Last Mimzy. A clip from that discussion opens week’s show before Phil provides an update on his recovery from AND preparation for eye surgery, and Dean provides an update on some very interesting live comedy shows he is doing. One is his improv episode of “The X-Files” and you can see it this month in Detroit! Then, the gents move this week’s episode into the Chillpak morgue, where a maverick U.S. Presidential candidate, an all-star pitcher who became a controversial author and a successful actor, one of the greatest character actors of all time, a legend of Italian cinema, and a star of the original “Willy Wonka” all get remembered in “Celebrity Deaths”. A couple more thoughts related to last week’s discussion of what approach will most likely lead to creating great television get shared. Then, Dean and Phil discuss the controversy surrounding the American Cinematheque and the landmark Egyptian Theatre. Finally, they compare notes on Alfred Hitchcock’s fascinating Rope and the recent releases Us from Jordan Poole and Under the Silver Lake from David Robert Mitchell.  

Seven important notes about this week’s show:

1) It’s our 600th episode!
2) It features a brand new version of the theme song appropriate to Dean’s relocation to the Motor City.
3) A horrible recording problem leads to a few choppy transitions at the start of the show and to an extremely bad electronic hum during the first 25 minutes or so of the show.
4) We have done the best we can to get rid of the hum and to at least make these first 25 minutes listenable, and you will want to bear with us as those minutes contain very personal conversation between Dean and Phil about things they love lost in the current SoCal fires, what they love that is seriously threatened by those fires, and about a great Canadian actor of Dean’s acquaintance who died this month. There is also a great story about baby diapers!
5) Several amazing movies get discussed – including the Sandra Bullock starring post-apocalyptic, action-horror vehicle Bird Box, the Coen Brothers rather amazing Western anthology feature The Ballad of Buster Scruggs, Alfonso Cuaron’s seminal black-and-white memory piece Roma and Dean and Phil’s very own The Lady Killers, which Dean has finally seen!
6) The show is 72 minutes long, with about 45 minutes of that boasting clean audio!
7) We wish you all a “Malkovich Hug”!

Now that Dean once again lives in the USA, he and Phil will be recording YOUR Chillpak Hollywood Hour on Monday mornings! This week, they compare notes on the Steve Martin-Martin Short touring stage show, and share thoughts about the recent spate of re-booted television series of yesteryear and those reboots recently announced. The lives of a “swamp rock” legend, a WW II “Monuments Man”, the inventor of green bean casserole, the greatest trumpeter of his generation, and Phil’s all-time favorite baseball player will be remembered in “Celebrity Deaths”. Then, grab the popcorn because your friends in podcasting have a bunch of disparate cinematic offerings to discuss, from horror classics like Nosferatu and The Wolf Man to such contemporary releases as Bohemian RhapsodyBoy ErasedA Private War, and Orson Welles’ The Other Side of the Wind.

After last week’s outstanding episode, your friends in podcasting keep the movie talk going as they remember Robby Muller, the late great “Master of Light”, perhaps the most important cinematographer in independent cinema over the final 30 years of the 20th Century. Dean and Phil then discuss what it means on those rare occasions when critics like a movie far more than audiences do. It’s common for audiences to like a film more than critics, but who is to blame when critics love a film and audiences HATE it? Your friends in podcasting answer that question before shifting gears into an incredible “Live Event of the Week”. They welcome special guest Zac Greenberg, the composer of The Bradbury Tattoos: A Rock Opera, which premieres this month in Cincinnati courtesy of a National Endowment of the Arts Grant. Based on four Ray Bradbury short stories from “The Illustrated Man (including “Kaleidoscope”, which Dean once starred in on-stage in Los Angeles as part of Sci-Fest L.A.), this sci-fi spectacular promises to be a production like no other! Oh, and make sure to stay tuned following the closing music and announcements for a sensational Easter egg!