The first half of this week’s show is all about the art and craft and future of podcasting! Storyteller Dave Pickering joins us from his home in Lancaster in the north of England to talk about his brilliant podcasts (“Getting Better Acquainted”, “Down to a Sunless Sea”, “The Family Tree” and more), about college lectures he gives about podcasting, about where he sees the art form at present, and what he thinks the future might hold. Actress Lily Holleman drops by in the second half of the show to reveal her Screen Actors Guild Awards ballot and to discuss what she looks for in performances. A whole bunch of great movies and performers get discussed. Great podcasts and great movies – truly two of our favorite things!

Your friends in podcasting follow up on last week’s conversation about how the response to hatred and violence directed at the AAPI community might shape the current movie awards season and in the second half of the show, they welcome a great friend, journalist and member of the AAPI community, Yoshi Kato, who weighs in on a year of hate crimes, as well as a year of pandemic and the toll it has taken on the music business and on the business of writing about the music business! He also weighs in on Dean’s Doberman, the Paramount Network and both his favorite and least favorite superhero movies! In the show’s first half, Dean discusses a new Korean sci-fi film, and Phil discusses a classic German sci-fi miniseries! There are also 4 vintage movie ads discussed in connection with four “celebrity deaths” as the careers of two great performers, one leading French filmmaker, and a best-selling, award-winning novelist get celebrated.

This week’s toe-tapping, funny bone-tickling, mind-expanding, Atlantic Ocean-crossing epic installment gets started with perhaps the most pleasant surprise surrounding today’s Oscar nominations. From there, it’s onto an amazing email from loyal listener Maurice Terenzio, who instead of focusing on “Celebrity Deaths” inspires Dean and Phil to celebrate the final four performers of the silent era who are still alive! After that, Dean and Phil welcome good friend and intrepid investigative journalist Mark Bennett to discuss his health travails of the last year, Oak Island and Nazi UFOs! In fact, Mark has launched a very cool crowd-sourcing campaign for his proposed documentary Nazi Flying Saucers: Hunting Hitler’s Secret UFOs. The second half of the show is a check-in with Jon Lawlor, who has provided many Chillpak Hollywood Hour theme songs thru the years, as well as the awesome theme song to The Truth Is Out There, and who first lent his vocal talents to a Phil Leirness-directed project in 2002! Jon reveals the hardest part of pandemic life for him, discusses living with depression, describes the changes he would like to see as we emerge from pandemic and discusses his new music. All that, plus he joins Dean in playing the latest round of the vintage movie ad game! If you are looking for the heartfelt, the hilarious, and “exoskeletons of desire”, you have come to the right place!

This week’s episode is full of a lot of what Dean and Phil do best! In “Celebrity Deaths”, they remember the singer of one of Phil’s all-time favorite songs, an artist who truly made his mark on Wall Street, a trailblazing theatre impresario, Beat poetry’s greatest champion, and in celebrating these giants, Dean and Phil also celebrate diversity. That can NOT be said for the Golden Globes, which aired this weekend and which are (once again) mired in controversy. Dean and Phil will have a ball unpacking those controversies, and perhaps stirring up some of their own where TV Awards are concerned! Still, with award shows and with the recent news surrounding movie theaters and movie release dates, it seems as if we are going to be returning to some semblance of “normal” in the not-too-distant future. Dean and Phil cover all of that, plus their views on three award hopefuls: The Little Things, One Night in Miami and Judas and the Black Messiah. They also champion two great new songs, one a Golden Globe-nominated modern classic, and the other, a terrific single from our very own Jon Lawlor! All that, plus Dean and Phil have fun with a couple more vintage movie ads.

In the first half of this week’s show, Dean and Phil discuss the latest controversial news surround filmmakers Joss Whedon and Woody Allen and ask how do we separate the art from the artist? And should we? After that, a Motown great, a rap great, the Godfather of salsa, a groundbreaking singer and DJ, and a pioneer of jazz fusion all get remembered in “Celebrity Deaths”. The second half of the show is part 2 of the roundtable discussion that began last week, where special guests Marc Hershon and Suli McCullough compare notes with Dean about pursuing careers in comedy. On this week’s agenda are the topics of the pandemic and how it has and will change professional comedy, and the importance of pain in comedy.

Under the heading “Best Laid Plans”, Dean was supposed to be on the road and he and Phil had two very special “theme” shows planned as a result. What went wrong? Find out in this week’s very pleasing installment of YOUR Chillpak Hollywood Hour! You will hear Dean and Phil discuss a wide array of topics, such as their all-time favorite television episodes, an amazing story about a theater company in 1991, the importance of (and lack of) local news, the ways life will have changed even after the pandemic is in our collective rearview mirror, some hilarious observations about pandemic life, and a little-known, truly bad-ass recording by the most famous singer to come out of Tupelo, Mississippi. Oh, yeah, and how Dolly Parton might just save us all!

California is on fire and Phil gives a full report from Turlock. Meanwhile, Dean Haglund is singing for charity along with the entire cast of “The X-Files” to benefit the World Central Kitchen. And speaking of “The X-Files” Dean wants to discuss the films of former “X-Files” director Rob Bowman in anticipation of a series of shows about the movie directors that are the all-time favorite filmmakers of your friends in podcasting. As promised last week, the implosion of the SAG-Aftra health plan gets dissected and analyzed from several angles. Finally, in “Celebrity Deaths”, a classically trained star of stage of screen, a young star of 70’s independent cinema, a 70’s sitcom fixture, a sex symbol of early TV, a Beat Goddess and Canada’s First Lady of the Blues all get remembered and celebrated.

Because he’s been driving all over California, Phil tackles the insane, apocalyptic weather racking the Golden State, and Dean updates on the building of his steam room and his graphic novel (both of which are long-awaited) on this week’s installment of YOUR Chillpak Hollywood Hour. The madness of America is addressed through the oddly appropriate lens of Martin Scorsese’s The Last Temptation of Christ and speaking of Scorsese, his mentor, John Cassavetes is very much a subject of discussion, from his directing of the under-seen classic The Killing of a Chinese Bookie to his acting in such crowd-pleasers as the 1964 version of The Killers and The Dirty Dozen. And one of the “Dozen”, the great music star-turned-actor Trini Lopez gets remembered in “Celebrity Deaths”. Robert Altman’s penultimate film, The Company, receives some fascinating analysis. And speaking of fascinating analysis, somehow a discussion of TV’s “Columbo” and “Law and Order: Criminal Intent” allow Dean and Phil to figure out once and for all why the Back to the Future sequels are so bad! At the close, your friends in podcasting preview next week’s show when they will be discussing the series nominated for the Emmy in the “Best Comedy” category and the dire circumstances threatening SAG-Aftra in the wake of the union’s health plan implosion.

Best laid plans … Phil had to hit the road for an emergency trip this week, which inspires him to ask Dean whether “plans” are a thing of the past, a luxury one is foolish to consider in our contemporary world. Of course plans are being made to re-start motion picture and television production, and your friends in podcasting will analyze these plans and how movies and TV shows will be different both on-screen and behind-the-scenes as the industry moves forward. A headline-making shakeup in show business occurred at the vaunted comedy institution Second City in the wake of recent social justice protests. This will get discussed in depth, as will America’s empathy deficit, with some insightful analysis and heartfelt and hilarious stories about empathy, or the lack thereof, from Dean and Phil. So, buckle up, and if this week’s show seems a bit all-over-the-map topically (technically?), well rest assured, that’s because it IS coming at you from … all over the map!

Longtime listeners know that Dean Haglund and Phil Leirness are often at their best when things in the world seem their worst. If an hour of insightful, inspiring, heartfelt and humorous conversation is something your soul could use at present, give a listen as your friends in podcasting try to make sense of a world torn apart by pandemic, shaken to the core by violence, and held spellbound by explorers slipping the surly bonds of earth, as for the first time in a decade, America sent astronauts into space. Dean and Phil discuss all of it and share an essay by a good friend of the show about a passage in history more than 50 years old that seems more relevant than ever. They also tackle the important question, “Can a puppet show provide healing?” And that leads to Dean’s detailed analysis of a particular song. In “Celebrity Deaths”, Dean and Phil remember one of Phil’s very favorite character actors, a man who began and concluded his acting career with Best Picture Oscar winners. They also remember a groundbreaking playwright, screenwriter and activist, as well as an Asian-American pioneer for civil rights and social justice. Finally, they commend Netflix for their social stance and for a brand new comedy series.