Following a “cold open” all about another of Dean’s all-time favorite episodes of “The X-Files”, Dean and Phil open their mailbag to answer questions from listeners like you (yes, YOU!). One email concerns why actor Nicholas Lea never appeared on the spin-off series “The Lone Gunmen” and whether Dean would ever join the internet service “Cameo”. Another is from friend of the show Yoshi Kato, who can’t quite remember whether his friends in podcasting have ever done a show about their favorite movie musicals. They have. And episode #497 is once again available for listening pleasure! Finally, loyal listener and good buddy, Greg Vincent, asks a very compelling question about Blade Runner 2049. Dean offers up a brief review of A Quiet Place Part II, Phil offers up a surprisingly glowing review of Birds of Prey (and the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn) before launching into an analysis of the head-scratching financial reality of the D.C. Extended Universe. Finally, “The Mod Squad” star Clarence Williams III and 80s “video vixen” Tawny Kitaen get remembered in “Celebrity Deaths”.

This week’s show begins with an email from a listener in Ireland about dialect coaches and “Hollywood accounting”. After that, Dean and Phil analyze the box office struggles of the brand new In the Heights and this inspires them to look back at two song and dance films that opened on the same day many years ago, both based on the same dance craze. It also inspires them to look ahead to big blockbuster hopefuls coming out this month as well as smaller “smart house” movies all looking for some post-pandemic domestic box office love. The Angelina Jolie vehicle Those Who Wish me Dead gets reviewed. Casting news for “John Wick 4”, the Marvel MCU and “Indiana Jones 5” gets discussed. Phil follows up on his discussion of “The Undoing” by singling out two actors (and their characters) who make the show ultimately worthwhile(ish). Dean offers up an English-language Netflix series shot in Sweden as a viewing recommendation, he regales with tales of the art work he has been creating, and he reveals another of his all-time favorite episodes of “The X-Files”. Finally, Dean and Phil compare notes on their travel plans for the summer before playing an entire four-round “Steven Seagal” edition of their Vintage Movie Ad game!

Phil is back in Los Angeles. Dean is at home in Birmingham, Michigan, and they are unpacking the mysteries of Dean’s sleep schedule, a California town called “Chowchilla” and the US Government report on UFOs. The subject of paranoia gets get a deep dive analysis. Another of Dean’s favorite episodes of “The X-Files” gets revealed. HBO’s “Mare of Easttown” gets reviewed through comparisons with such other recent HBO procedurals as “True Detective” and “The Undoing”. Movies are back, box office is promising, and Dean and Phil celebrate the success of two new horror movies, before offering up a classic 2016 horror film from South Korea. This leads into remembrances of a major (and controversial) figure in the emergence of Korean cinema of the 21st Century, who died of Covid-19 in December. The rise and fall of a legendary attorney gets discussed in “Celebrity Deaths”, as does the legacy of one the great songwriters of the 1970’s and 1980’s. Finally, your friends in podcasting will play another couple rounds of their new Vintage Movie Ad game, this week featuring action stars of the 80’s and 90’s!

Dean files one last report from Detroit before spending the rest of the year in L.A. What does he hope to accomplish while he is there, what has he been working on and how is a certain graphic novel coming along? Not only will you find out on this week’s show, you will also learn about the (tongue-in-cheek?) Turlock-based detective series Phil has conceived! Of course, Dean and Phil have several serious show biz and culture-related topics to cover as well, from current box office news to an overlooked Sean Connery film that is a true gem, from a Netflix riff on Sherlock Holmes to an Apple TV+ workplace sitcom starring Jason Sudeikis. In “Celebrity Deaths”, they will remember a true behind-the-camera titan of live television, a groundbreaking Broadway performer-turned-TV show creator, and the co-creator of one of the most beloved animated shows of all time. Plus, Dean and Phil will continue their discussion on taking things too seriously in the “public square”.

No broken finger can keep Dean Haglund from joining Phil Leirness for another brand new installment of YOUR Chillpak Hollywood Hour! This week, your friends in podcasting talk about what they miss because of Covid-19 (and are certain to be missing for the rest of this year at least). Dean and Phil then explain why there might not be many new movies or television shows for a long while. They will, however, discuss several recent titles like Cats, Alita: Battle Angel and It Chapter Two as well as several under-appreciated, vintage gems like John Frankenheimer’s Seconds, Samuel Fuller’s The Crimson Kimono and the jazz adaptation of “Othello” All Night Long. Plus, Phil has harsh criticism for a couple beloved musicals from the 1950s! In “Lawsuit of the Week”, Dean and Phil discuss a courtroom victory for Jerry Seinfeld. Then, following a mea culpa from Dean about an error made on last week’s show, the Chillpak Morgue opens for “Celebrity Deaths” where a glass ceiling-shattering broadcaster and a world-class independent filmmaker and director of top television are remembered. Finally, Phil shares a story about perhaps the greatest phrase ever uttered before death. 

After a cold open in which Dean Haglund and Phil Leirness celebrate the fact that YOUR Chillpak Hollywood Hour becomes a teen-ager this week, they launch into what they do best, trying to make sense of a (Covid-19) world gone wild with humor, insight, irreverence and inspiration. In the return of “Wingnut of the Week”, Dean and Phil offer a wag of the finger at Covid-19 conspiracy theorists and a doff of the cap to UFO “truthers”. In “Celebrity Deaths”, they pay tribute to a true titan of comedy publishing and filmmaking, an international star who broke big in both Bollywood and Hollywood, a character actor-turned-casting director, an influential folk singer, and the musician who turned Hugh Grant into a pop star! Then, your friends in podcasting tackle how Covid-19 will affect the up-coming television season, and how it will affect the Oscars, before turning their attention to what years in cinema might rival 1962 as the best year ever for movies! 

From the inner space of quiet, self-quarantine lockdowns, to the outer space of “Star Trek: Picard”, Dean Haglund and Phil Leirness take you on quite the journey this week! It starts with their latest observations about themselves and others in the wake of another week of isolation. Sadness, quiet and dehumanization are on the thematic menu! They then compare notes on their respective Easter celebrations, which leads to a discussion of a couple of classic musicals: 1934’s Fred Astaire-Ginger Rogers vehicle The Gay Divorcee and 1948’s seasonal staple Easter Parade, starring Astaire and Judy Garland. The recent, modern classic, Uncut Gems gets championed by Phil, who tries to get Dean to overcome his trepidation surrounding Adam Sandler performances (and yet, Dean once championed You Don’t Mess With the Zohan, so go figure!). The second half of the show consists of Dean and Phil comparing the years in cinema 1973 and 1974, discussing all the notable films from those two halcyon years, in hopes of determining which year might challenge 1962 as the greatest year in cinema. Finally, your friends in podcasting beam up to the La Sirena to discuss and debate what went right and what went wrong in season one of “Star Trek: Picard”, a show so successful that a big-screen movie version is already in the planning stages.

Tucker Smallwood is immediately recognizable to fans of science fiction for playing Commodore Ross on “Space: Above and Beyond”, for playing Sheriff Andy Taylor in “Home”, the most notorious of all episodes of “The X-Files”, for playing the flight commander in Contact, for playing the Xindi Humanoid in “Star Trek: Enterprise”, for playing Admiral Bullock in “Star Trek: Voyager” and those are just his highest profile sci-fi roles. An actor, an author, a musician and a decorated military veteran, Tucker Smallwood joins your friends in podcasting to discuss two classic Francis Coppola movies in which he was involved.

After 12 and a half years of “changing the way people listen to the internet”, Dean Haglund and Phil Leirness bring YOUR Chillpak Hollywood Hour to ODYSY Radio for “season 2” of their long-running show! On this week’s maiden ODYSY voyage, your friends in podcasting re-set all topics, making this a perfect time to join Chillpak Nation! They run through their show biz bona fides, they regale with stories of recent travel adventures, they celebrate the lives of two seminal figures in “Celebrity Deaths”, they discuss some of the greatest movies to be directed by women, they tackle a “Lawsuit of the Week” involving Madonna, they hail the music of the Mississippi Delta in “Live Event of the Week”, they analyze the Department of Justice plan to repeal the Paramount Consent Decrees in “Explanation of the Week”, and they preview a future show (and special guest) in “What We’re Reading”. Is there something for everyone? We like to think so! Warning: Dean and Phil’s high-spirited, artful, irreverent, insightful and inspiring conversation can be habit-forming!

It’s Veterans Day in the USA and Remembrance Day in other nations (like Dean’s homeland of Canada), so this week’s show starts with what the day means to your friends in podcasting and how they will commemorate it. Sort of. Then, in “Celebrity Deaths”, a great screen villain, a comedic character actor, and an acclaimed novelist are remembered. From there, it’s a lot of great television (we’re looking at you “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” and “Watchmen”), and dreadful television (yikes, HBO, what happened with “His Dark Materials”?!). Finally, Dean and Phil weigh in on movie theaters’ anger towards Netflix, Netflix’s dominance of this movie season, and two forthcoming films (Bombshell and The Two Popes) get reviewed.