Your friends in podcasting celebrate summer and the traditional “summer movie season” with a show full of great movie directors. First, Dean and Phil remember three groundbreaking directors in “Celebrity Deaths” – one of whom directed some of the best box office hits of the 70’s, 80’s and 90’s, one of whom was a key figure in underground cinema and one of whom directed one of the greatest American movies of all time! Such titans of international cinema as Francois Truffaut and Sweden’s Roy Andersson get their turns in the spotlight as well. Then, it turns out one of the greatest filmmakers of our era has purchased one of greatest movie theaters in the world. Dean and Phil discuss what this portends for the future of movie-going. Finally, one brand new movie release from Oscar-winner Steven Soderbergh and one classic Australian film from Bruce Beresford get appraised, before a long-promised Aussie-themed edition of our Vintage Movie Ad game gets played!

Dean and Phil follow up on last week’s awesome show by discussing more about “Hollywood accounting” and how in show biz the “bottom line” is often NOT the bottom line! Last week, while discussing the box office struggles of the brand new In the Heights, Dean and Phil were inspired to look back at two dance films based on the same craze that opened on the same day many years ago, one of which boasted a music score from Phil’s frequent collaborator, Greg De Belles. Greg composed the score for Phil’s Karl Rove, I Love You and for Dean and Phil’s The Truth Is Out There and The Lady Killers. Greg died on Friday, and Dean and Phil speak of their immensely talented friend. Of course, the box office struggles continue, so Dean and Phil discuss how a Pixar movie might have been able to change everything. That leads into a deep dive into Disney +, the movie Soul, the miniseries “WandaVision” and the episodic series “The Mandalorian”. There is also a lot of talk about painting, from the advice given by the great Leigh McCloskey to the thematic approach of the Barbizon school of artists and the brilliance of Julian Schnabel’s Van Gogh film At Eternity’s Gate. Finally, Dean and Phil celebrate the careers of an Oscar-nominated character actor and a beloved sitcom actor and director.