We hope this finds you having enjoyed a happy and healthy New Year. Twelfth Night is a festival that takes place on the last night of the Twelve Days of Christmas, marking the coming of the Epiphany. Shakespeare’s “Twelfth Night” (or “What You Will”), is a romantic comedy by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written around 1601–1602 as a Twelfth Night’s entertainment for the close of the Christmas season. On this week’s brand new Season 2 Episode 109 of YOUR Chillpak Hollywood Hour, Dean and Phil celebrate both the holiday season AND the immortal Bard of Stratford on Avon by counting down each of their 12 all-time favorite cinematic adaptations of Shakespeare! Brevity might be the soul of wit, but your friends in podcasting (and broadcasting) have an hour to fill!

It’s the midst of the holiday season. Travel plans are ramping up and the awards season is starting to heat up! The American Film Institute has revealed its honorees as the top (ten) films of 2021 and a consensus has begun to form through critics Top Ten lists about the best movies of the year as well. Dean and Phil discuss it all. They analyze (and “contextualize”) three new award-hopeful releases from major directors: Guillermo del Toro’s Nightmare Alley, Joel Coen’s The Tragedy of Macbeth and Jane Campion’s The Power of the Dog. They also celebrate foreign films, the Oscars, country rock, The Monkees, the Bronski Beat, New Orleans, The Beasts of the Southern Wild, Interview with the Vampire, telenovelas and more in “Celebrity Deaths”.

It’s Halloween season, so this week, Dean and Phil will get into the spooky spirit of things by celebrating “All of the Them Witches” – programming a dream film festival of witch-themed double-features! Of course, there is a ton of spooky, unsettling and downright terrifying show biz news for them to cover as well, including the potential resolution of the IATSE conflict with the AMPTP prior to almost all film and television productions getting shut down, the messy publicity slaughterhouse that continues to ensue following Dave Chappelle’s “The Closer” and Netflix CEO Ted Sarandos’ response to it, and a little bit of “inside” info regarding Marvel’s Black Widow. All that, plus really good box office news and a pioneering animator, a chart-topping bassist, and a best-selling YA novelist get remembered in “Celebrity Deaths”.

This week’s episode is full of a lot of what Dean and Phil do best! In “Celebrity Deaths”, they remember the singer of one of Phil’s all-time favorite songs, an artist who truly made his mark on Wall Street, a trailblazing theatre impresario, Beat poetry’s greatest champion, and in celebrating these giants, Dean and Phil also celebrate diversity. That can NOT be said for the Golden Globes, which aired this weekend and which are (once again) mired in controversy. Dean and Phil will have a ball unpacking those controversies, and perhaps stirring up some of their own where TV Awards are concerned! Still, with award shows and with the recent news surrounding movie theaters and movie release dates, it seems as if we are going to be returning to some semblance of “normal” in the not-too-distant future. Dean and Phil cover all of that, plus their views on three award hopefuls: The Little Things, One Night in Miami and Judas and the Black Messiah. They also champion two great new songs, one a Golden Globe-nominated modern classic, and the other, a terrific single from our very own Jon Lawlor! All that, plus Dean and Phil have fun with a couple more vintage movie ads.

With special “theme” shows planned to ring out 2020 and ring in 2021, this week’s show will be the last of Dean and Phil’s usual irreverent and insightful show biz grab bags for a few weeks! In it, they celebrate the lives of two Broadway legends, an accomplished New Orleans-based actress, and a “Star Wars” icon. They discuss some of their favorite Christmas movies and share what movies they have gravitated towards this holiday season. They offer up a few holiday-themed movie print ads in what has become a weekly tradition. They discuss why Hitchcockian cinema (i.e. Hitchock-like movies directed by people other than Hitchcock) might have had its peak in the 1970s. They weigh in on Tom Cruise’s Covid-19 safety protocol rant. All that, plus, “The Mandalorian”, “Star Trek: Discovery”, “The Boys” and John Cassavetes!

Your friends in podcasting have big news to share about where and how YOUR Chillpak Hollywood Hour can be found and enjoyed starting in December! This week’s episode begins with that news and touches on a variety of topics before buckling down to discuss great films, great filmmakers and great actors. Martin Scorsese’s epic The Irishman and Eddie Murphy’s comeback in Dolemite is My Name get fully analysis as do the films of Abbas Kiarostami and Denis Villeneuve.